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Showing 1946 results for Murder Incorporated sorted by

MediaJun 5, 2020 | 03:00 GMT
Pen and Sword: Yellow Bird with Sierra Crane Murdoch
This Pen and Sword podcast is about Lissa Yellow Bird -- a Native American investigator who took on her tribe, the legal system and her family to uncover truth and find justice. The book is Yellow Bird: Oil, Murder, and a Woman's Search for Justice in Indian Country and the author is Sierra Crane Murdoch.
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On SecurityFeb 25, 2020 | 10:00 GMT
The Miami skyline, photographed on April 29, 2019.
Signs of a Thwarted Russian Hit in Miami
Since former KGB officer and FSB director Vladimir Putin became Russia's president, the country's intelligence agencies have regained much of their Cold War power. As Putin's power has grown, his intelligence services have grown commensurately bolder. Though the Kremlin invariably will try to deny any role in or knowledge of
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PodcastsFeb 24, 2020 | 21:49 GMT
'The Spy Who Couldn't Spell,' With Author Yudhijit Bhattacharjee
In this episode of Stratfor's Pen and Sword Podcast, Stratfor Chief Security Officer Fred Burton speaks with author Yudhijit Bhattacharjee about his book, "The Spy Who Couldn't Spell." "The Spy Who Couldn't Spell" tells the story of a disgruntled and dyslexic FBI employee-turned-traitor named Brian Regan. In vivid detail, the book recounts
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AssessmentsJan 29, 2020 | 01:14 GMT
A man at an electronics store in Modiin, Israel, watches U.S. President Donald Trump and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu unveil the Trump administration's Mideast peace plan during a White House news conference on Jan. 28, 2020.
Trump's Mideast Peace Plan Offers a 2-State Path, in Theory
U.S. President Donald Trump's long-awaited Israeli-Palestinian peace plan, released Jan. 28, may appear to try and appease both sides, but it will function as more of a one-state solution in disguise. The plan heavily favors Israeli demands and lacked the incorporation of Palestinian input throughout much of its drafting. As
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Regions & CountriesJanuary 28, 2020 | 22:09 GMT
El Salvador
El Salvador
The tiny country of El Salvador is typical of Central America's geographic challenges. Nestled south of Honduras, southeast of Guatemala and northwest of Nicaragua, El Salvador's landmass is small — even compared to its neighbors. Throughout most of its history, El Salvador was an agricultural society. The mountainous terrain and relative isolation from the rest of the world encouraged subsistence agriculture but very little profitable economic activity. Despite the growth of some industry, such as textile manufacturing, in the late 20th century, El Salvador remains a very underdeveloped country. This underdevelopment fostered stark political divisions in the country's society. Abroad, El Salvador is perhaps best known for a 13-year civil war between communist-backed forces and the U.S.-backed government. The war ended in 1992, but the country remains politically split along economic class lines and between the left and right. The main political parties in the country are those organized around members of the now-disbanded leftist guerrilla movement and the right-leaning government. Illegal migration and violent crime remain the principal concern in El Salvador for the United States. El Salvador is simply too small and too resource-poor to sustain its population. Explosive population growth in the mid-20th century, endemic poverty and civil war caused mass migration abroad. More than a million Salvadorans fled the country, mostly to the United States. After the conflict, violent crime — mainly in the form of criminal gangs such as MS-13 and Barrio 18, and their numerous cliques across the country — compounded the migration problem. To this day, remittances from Salvadorans living in the United States are one of the main sources of foreign income for the country's economy. For the United States, neither of the security concerns from El Salvador are first-tier foreign policy priorities. Instead, they are persistent issues that some administrations choose to take more seriously than others.
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Regions & CountriesJanuary 28, 2020 | 22:09 GMT
China
China

China is situated on the eastern third of the Eurasian landmass, between Russia, mainland Southeast Asia, the Indian subcontinent and Central Asia. Its more than 9,000 mile-long coastline abuts the Yellow, East and South China Seas. China is a country of deep geographic divisions. Most fundamental is the split between its fertile eastern lowlands and the arid, sparsely populated highlands that enclose the lowlands like a shell. More than a billion people live in the ethnic Han Chinese core, making it one of the most densely populated places on Earth. Traditionally, threats to China's Han core originated in the borderlands. To guard against overland invasion, successive Chinese rulers have sought to push the Core's borders outward —integrating these highlands as strategic "buffer" zones. These zones form a shield, protecting and containing the core. To be secure, China must control the buffer regions. But maintaining control of the regions, in turn, requires a strong and united core. And that means overcoming immense internal divisions — not only between northern and southern regions orbiting the Yellow and Yangtze rivers, but also between smaller regional units, each with their own geography, history, dialect and interests. Chinese history is defined by cycles of unity and fragmentation, from periods when a strong Han core captures and holds the surrounding buffers to those when a weak core breaks into its constituent parts, loses internal coherence and cedes control of the borderlands. This pattern, rooted in China's geography, has played out with remarkable consistency. By comparison, China's maritime interests have remained mostly limited to coastal waters. Today, however, growing international trade and rising Chinese reliance on overseas resources threaten to alter the pattern, adding a new maritime dimension to the struggle for buffer space — and potentially upending the long-standing dynamics of China's geographic challenge.

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