For more targeted results combine or exclude search terms by applying the Boolean Operators AND, OR and AND NOT. Place quotations around your search term to find documents that contain that exact phrase
51441 Results
Search in Text
Search in Title

Showing 51441 results for it Matters sorted by

SITUATION REPORTJan 22, 2021 | 22:58 GMT
Japan: Tokyo Olympics May Be Called off
The Japanese government has reportedly reached an internal consensus that it will need to cancel the Tokyo summer Olympic Games, which had already been rescheduled from 2020, and will look to secure the 2032 slot, The Times reported Jan. 21, citing an unidentified senior member of Japan’s ruling coalition.
READ MORE
Contributor PerspectivesJan 22, 2021 | 22:47 GMT
The steps of the pyramid of Djoser are seen in Egypt's Saqqara necropolis, south of the capital Cairo, on March 5, 2020.
The Ziggurat of Zealotry: Applying Lessons Learned from Fighting al Qaeda to Right-Wing Extremism
A terrorist is a terrorist is a terrorist. The dynamics of radicalization are remarkably similar across ideological, religious, and political lines. Looking at right-wing groups, which pose the biggest threat at the moment, we can apply the same tools we used on Salafi-Jihadist extremism after 9/11. The heyday of left-wing extremism passed a few decades ago, despite the obsessive use of the term “radical left.” There is a structure to extremism apart from its content. My former colleagues and I called it the “Ziggurat of Zealotry.”
READ MORE
SnapshotsJan 22, 2021 | 22:03 GMT
A photo taken on Oct. 21, 2020, shows the logos (left to right) of Google, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat and TikTok on a computer screen.
Australia’s Proposed Media Code Turns Up the Heat on Google and Facebook
Australia’s pursuit of a media code that would force Facebook and Google to pay for sharing content from local media companies risks pushing the U.S. tech giants to pull some of their services from the country. During a Jan. 22 Australian Senate hearing, Google’s Managing Director for Australia and New Zealand Mel Silva said that if the country’s News Media and Digital Platforms Mandatory Bargaining Code is implemented in its current form, Google would have no choice but to remove Google Search from Australia. Later in the day, Facebook representatives echoed these remarks, threatening to pull Facebook News from Australia. In response to Google’s ultimatum, Prime Minister Morrison said that his country does not respond to threats.
READ MORE
SnapshotsJan 22, 2021 | 19:33 GMT
An intercontinental ballistic missile launcher and an armored vehicle are displayed during a military parade in Moscow, Russia, on June 24, 2020, to commemorate the 75th anniversary of Russia’s victory in World War II.
Biden’s Proposed New START Extension Won’t Restart U.S.-Russia Relations
The White House’s push to extend the New START nuclear treaty with Russia will give it space to impose penalties on Moscow’s antagonistic behavior without worrying about the collapse of the two countries’ last remaining major arms control agreement. On Jan. 21, U.S. Press Secretary Jen Psaki confirmed previous media reporting when she formally announced that President Joe Biden would seek a five-year extension of New START, which limits the two sides’ nuclear arsenals and is due to expire on Feb. 5. 
READ MORE
SITUATION REPORTJan 21, 2021 | 22:12 GMT
Hong Kong: City Mandates Loyalty Oaths for Members of Opposition-Dominated District Council 
Beginning as early as February, members of Hong Kong's pro-democracy dominated district council will be required to swear a controversial loyalty oath to Hong Kong and the Basic Law in compliance with the national security law, the South China Morning Post reported Jan. 21, citing a statement made by Secretary for Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Erick Tsang Kwok-wai. 
READ MORE
SnapshotsJan 21, 2021 | 22:07 GMT
Spanish newspapers show images of newly sworn-in U.S. President Joe Biden on Jan. 21, 2021, in Madrid, Spain.
The EU Welcomes Biden, But Some Disputes Will Remain
Joe Biden’s presidency portends greater U.S.-EU coordination on areas like climate change, COVID-19 and human rights. But Washington and Brussels will likely still spar over trade, tech policy and defense spending. On the day of Biden’s Jan. 20 inauguration, European Council President Charles Michel called for a “founding pact” between the United States and the European Union based on five priorities: boosting multilateral cooperation, fighting against COVID-19, tackling climate change, rebuilding the global economy with a digital transformation, and joining forces on security and peace. Also on Jan. 20, the European Union’s chief diplomat, Joseph Borrell, invited Biden’s new Secretary of State, Antony Blinken, to a meeting with EU foreign ministers in Lisbon, Portugal, on March 4-5 to restart cooperation.
READ MORE
SnapshotsJan 21, 2021 | 21:59 GMT
A picture taken on Nov. 12, 2020, shows a view of ongoing construction work at a Jewish settlement in the Israeli-annexed eastern sector of Jerusalem.
The Fate of Israeli-Arab Normalization Under Biden
The Biden administration is not signaling a strong interest in normalization, nor is it philosophically as likely to utilize the transactional means that helped its predecessor facilitate deals with countries like Sudan and Morocco. Trump’s uniquely close relationship with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu appeared to largely drive U.S. decisions made on Israel's behalf over the past four years. Biden, however, is unlikely to continue Trump’s strong pro-Israel policies. Biden has also shown more interest in other regional affairs that will limit his administration’s bandwidth to address Israel’s normalization status.  
READ MORE
SnapshotsJan 20, 2021 | 23:12 GMT
Houthi supporters hold up firearms as they protest the U.S. decision to designate the Houthi movement as a terrorist organization outside the closed American embassy on Jan. 18, 2021, in Sana'a, Yemen.
The Risks of the U.S. Dash to Declare Houthis Terrorists in Yemen
The former administration of U.S. President Donald Trump’s last-minute move to designate Houthi rebels as terrorists will leave its successor to manage the fallout in Yemen, which will likely include a more severe humanitarian crisis, more complicated intra-Yemeni political negotiations, and ultimately, a more entrenched civil conflict. On  Jan. 19, U.S. State Department designated the Houthi rebel movement in Yemen as a foreign terrorist organization and three of its leaders as “Specially Designated Global Terrorists.” The designations will trigger new financial sanctions that are intended to hold the Houthi movement “accountable for its terrorist acts, including cross-border attacks threatening civilian populations, infrastructure and commercial shipping.” The State Department made clear in a Jan. 10 statement that the terrorism designation was also aimed at freeing Yemen from “Iranian interference” as part of the then-Trump administration’s firm anti-Iran strategy. 
READ MORE
SITUATION REPORTJan 20, 2021 | 21:25 GMT
China, U.S.: Beijing Sanctions Trump Administration Officials After Biden Inauguration
Following the inauguration of U.S. President Joseph Biden, the Chinese government imposed sanctions on 28 Americans for interference with internal Chinese affairs, including former President Donald Trump, former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and former National Security Advisor John Bolton, the Global Times reported Jan. 20.
READ MORE
Stratfor Worldview

OUR COMMITMENT

To empower members to confidently understand and navigate a continuously changing and complex global environment.