For more targeted results combine or exclude search terms by applying the Boolean Operators AND, OR and AND NOT. Place quotations around your search term to find documents that contain that exact phrase
1167 Results
Search in Text
Search in Title

Showing 1167 results for memory lane sorted by

On GeopoliticsJun 3, 2020 | 10:00 GMT
Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi answers questions during a video press conference on May 24, 2020, in Beijing, China.
China’s ‘Wolf Warrior’ Diplomacy Risks Backfiring on Beijing
The growing global backlash against China's involvement in both the COVID-19 pandemic and Hong Kong's political crisis is fueling a new brand of "wolf warrior" diplomacy in Beijing based on a nationalistic Chinese movie. This more aggressive stance abroad exposes a sense of vulnerability in Beijing, and poses two potential risks for the regime -- the first is that the tactic backfires overseas, and the second, and perhaps more problematic, is that Beijing loses control of the nationalistic narrative.
READ MORE
AssessmentsMay 25, 2020 | 12:48 GMT
Remembering America's Allies on Memorial Day
Remembering America's Allies on Memorial Day
This year on Memorial Day, Stratfor would like to consider the countless individuals from across the globe who have worked and fought alongside the U.S. military, with this reflection originally penned in 2016. Memorial Day in the United States is dedicated to remembering the men and women who served and who died in service to country and mission. Yet these dedicated personnel are not alone; they are assisted by other foreign nations and by the security forces and civilian residents of the country in which the U.S. military is operating. Many brave individuals continue to partner with the United States and its allies. Many have returned to their normal lives in some semblance of peace. Some have left their homeland through choice or coercion, and still more have laid down their lives in pursuit of a better tomorrow.
READ MORE
On SecurityApr 23, 2020 | 11:00 GMT
Shoppers wearing face masks amid concerns over the COVID-19 novel coronavirus outbreak in a market in Seoul, South Korea, on March 14, 2020.
Learning How to Reopen a Country After COVID-19 Shutdowns
As governments around the world explore ways to emerge from the COVID-19 pandemic, easing the economic pain caused by lockdowns without causing even more damaging public health crises, they will be looking at the experience of other early outbreak countries to guide their actions. While best practices are emerging, recovery strategies will be tailored to the vulnerabilities of specific populations, and to governments' current capabilities. Whether the lessons of South Korea can be applied in the West remains to be seen.
READ MORE
AssessmentsApr 21, 2020 | 18:46 GMT
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un waves from his car after arriving in Vietnam on Feb. 26, 2019.
In North Korea, Kim's Rumored Ill-Health Renews Succession Fears
Recent reports of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's failing health have once again raised concerns around succession and regime stability, particularly as he has no children old enough to succeed him. Kim, however, has gone missing in the past, and there are few other signs of a brewing political or social crisis in North Korea that would indicate an imminent end to his reign. Indeed, in the coming days or weeks, he may again be spotted watching rocket launches through his binoculars, or visiting a construction or factory site to show his care for the people. But it is nonetheless still important to review succession scenarios due to the outsized risks of such a political transition in Pyongyang. 
READ MORE
AssessmentsFeb 7, 2020 | 10:00 GMT
An employee sits in the showroom of an Apple store in Beijing after it closed for the day on Feb. 1, 2020.
The Coronavirus Spreads Fears of a Shutdown in China's Tech Sector
Without question, the new coronavirus has taken a toll on China and many other places in the world, infecting at least 30,600 people and killing 633 as of Feb. 7. But only now, as the Lunar New Year holiday draws to a close, is Beijing preparing to assess just how much economic damage the coronavirus outbreak has wrought, especially as China is central to the global electronics and information technology sector. Ultimately, the breadth of the impact depends on how far the virus spreads beyond its current location. Hubei province and its capital, Wuhan, are not critical nodes for the vast majority of China's electronics sector. But neighboring provinces, including Shaanxi, Henan and Jiangxi, are home to cities that are prominent in the global technology sector, while the provinces with the second and third most confirmed cases so far, Zhejiang and Guangdong, are arguably China's two most critical areas for tech.
READ MORE
AssessmentsJan 31, 2020 | 18:47 GMT
This photo shows a masked vendor and customers of his wares in an alley in Wuhan, China, on January 31, 2020.
Measuring the Economic Impact of the Coronavirus Outbreak
The coronavirus outbreak that has killed scores and sickened thousands is set to deliver a significant blow to China's already-weakening economy. Quarantines and travel bans put into place to limit the spread of the illness already have disrupted one of the country's busiest travel and spending periods of the year, the Lunar New Year holiday, which began Jan. 25. The lockdowns have created major supply chain disruptions in Hubei province, the key Chinese transit hub and major manufacturing center for automobiles, fiber optic cable and machinery where the outbreak started. Public transportation, including trains, planes and ferries in and out Hubei -- whose provincial capital, Wuhan, was the epicenter of the outbreak -- have been suspended, with the freedom of movement curtailed for some 60 million people. The disruptions are not limited to the province, however, as business and industrial activities across the nation, already substantially slowed or even suspended
READ MORE
AssessmentsDec 4, 2019 | 10:00 GMT
Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed (R) speaks with French President Emmanuel Macron after signing agreements during a meeting on March 12, 2019, in Addis Ababa.
Why France Is Bullish on Business in Ethiopia
The Horn of Africa, with its booming economies and critical location that abuts key international shipping lanes, has long attracted outside interest -- as well as interminable conflicts. Yet as regional heavyweight Ethiopia opens its economy after decades of closed, state-centric development, new outside players are even more eager to do business there. Among that group is France, which is actively positioning its flagship companies to win big in the country in the years ahead. And luckily for Paris, Addis Ababa's long aversion to overdependence on any single outside power will boost French businesses as they seek to make inroads in a massive market of 110 million people.
READ MORE
AssessmentsNov 26, 2019 | 11:00 GMT
The Red Sea forms the background of this photo taken from the island of Saba in the Al-Zubair archipelago off the coast of Yemen
How Much Do the Houthis Threaten Red Sea Shipping?
In terms of past hijackings in the wider region, the incident was comparatively small: On Nov. 17, Houthi fighters seized Saudi and South Korean-flagged tugboats, as well as a South Korean drilling rig, near the island of Uqban. And following diplomatic efforts by Riyadh and Seoul, the Houthis released the vessels and their crews on Nov. 20, noting an internal investigation had revealed that the ships only entered Yemeni waters due to "bad weather." Indeed, apart from the seizure highlighting the occasional impact that Yemen's conflict can have on commercial shipping in the Red Sea, the incident does not presage a new age of piracy at the mouth of the Red Sea. While smaller vessels that stray too close to the Houthi-controlled coastline could find themselves in trouble, the rebels' lack of ability -- or even intent -- to target larger commercial traffic in the center of the Red Sea
READ MORE
Contributor PerspectivesNov 14, 2019 | 16:20 GMT
Konigsberg Cathedral and the Pregolya River are seen in this nighttime shot in Kaliningrad.
Kaliningrad: Measuring Up Against Europe, Not Mainland Russia
Sandwiched between European Union members Poland and Lithuania, Kaliningrad, Russia's westernmost outpost, has always been of great interest for many -- and not just because of its military significance and motley, centuries-old history. Indeed, the territory that is now Kaliningrad has been ruled at various times by the Teutonic Order, Prussia, imperialist Germany, the Soviets and, finally, Russia. For many who recall the Soviet past and live just a hop, skip and a jump away, the exclave is magnetic for its proximity and the preservation of the relics of the Soviet past. But once you're in Kaliningrad, "Russian" isn't quite the description that many want to hear, as it's a territory that looks more toward Europe than Russia.
READ MORE
On GeopoliticsOct 18, 2019 | 09:00 GMT
This picture shows a Chinese demonstrator throwing back a tear gas bottle during an anti-Japan protest in September 2012.
China's Risky Return to Nationalism
Chinese nationalism is once again on the rise. From the public military spectacle showcased at the Oct. 1 National Day parade, to the recent slew of boycotts against foreign firms for their perceived support of the Hong Kong protests, a burst of patriotic fervor has increasingly made its way into China's state policies, public behaviors and business decisions. It's no coincidence that this chauvinist surge has occurred in tandem with Beijing's rising strategic and ideological clashes with the United States and its allies over democracy and human rights issues in places like Hong Kong and Tibet. Today, Chinese patriotism can be characterized as an uneasy relationship between the population's feelings of pride, hopes and anxiety about the country's future, as well as a deep ambivalence toward the West. And the Communist Party has expertly harnessed these feelings to reinforce its role as the guardian of the Chinese state, emboldened a renewed sense of foreign
READ MORE
On GeopoliticsSep 26, 2019 | 09:00 GMT
South African law enforcement officers clash with looters during xenophobic violence and looting on Sept. 2, 2019, in Johannesburg.
South Africa Faces a Downward Spiral
"We are sorry for what happened," South African President Cyril Ramaphosa told a group of workers earlier this month in Durban. "Our image, our standing and our integrity [were] negatively affected." Ramaphosa offered the heartfelt mea culpa following yet another wave of xenophobic riots across South Africa, yet presidential apologies are unlikely to stanch more violence directed against foreigners there -- or cure the deeper malaise that drives the unrest. That's because successive governments in Pretoria have failed to foster essential economic growth in South Africa, which posted an eye-popping unemployment rate of 29 percent earlier this year. Every week, thousands of its citizens are forced into unemployment or underemployment in the extensive black market. 
READ MORE
On GeopoliticsSep 12, 2019 | 08:00 GMT
Iranian President Hassan Rouhani leads a Cabinet meeting in Tehran on Sept. 11, 2019.
Iran May Be Weak, But Its Strategy Is Working
Over the past three months, the U.S.-Iran conflict has gone from Washington's campaign of "maximum pressure" against Tehran to Iranian provocations that called the White House's bluff (and brought the region to the brink of war in the process) to a French-tailored diplomatic opening. Bloodied but unbowed, Tehran has endured Washington's sanctions, demonstrating to U.S. President Donald Trump that it has no intention of entertaining any of the United States' demands until it receives sanctions relief. The question now is whether, amid the glimmer of possible negotiations, the White House actually relents on sanctions or chooses to double down on its maximum pressure campaign to force through what it wants. That, however, is only likely to return the two foes to a stalemate -- and lead the Islamic republic to kick off a new cycle of tensions in the hopes of finding succor for its ailing economy.
READ MORE
Contributor PerspectivesAug 30, 2019 | 09:00 GMT
A young Georgian, right, wears a T-shirt with the Stormfront logo and the number 14/88 during a September 2016 rally. The number 14 denotes David Lane’s 14-word white supremacist mantra while 88, as the eighth letter of the alphabet, signifies HH, which stands for Heil Hitler.
In Georgia, It's Open Season for the Far-Right
With authorities often turning a blind eye to far-right and neo-Nazi activities and an increasingly unpopular government opening the way for more ultraconservative groupings to enter Parliament and spread their views, Georgia stands on the verge of a shift much further to the right.
READ MORE
Stratfor Worldview

OUR COMMITMENT

To empower members to confidently understand and navigate a continuously changing and complex global environment.