on the road

Colombia's Other Militancy Problem

Diego Solis
Field Researcher, Stratfor
Apr 16, 2017 | 13:00 GMT
Colombian United Self-Defense Forces (AUC) train Jan. 29, 2000, in the mountains northwest of Bogota. Though the group has officially been disbanded, its parts live on through Colombia's drug trade.
Colombian United Self-Defense Forces (AUC) train Jan. 29, 2000, in the mountains northwest of Bogota. Though the group has officially been disbanded, its parts live on through Colombia's drug trade.
(CARLOS GARCIA/AFP/Getty Images)

Colombia is not an easy country to govern. Its mountains and jungles have historically harbored towns and villages that have wildly different political worldviews and that have been in constant conflict since the country's independence in 1810. Political identity -- left or right -- has long been a defining feature of Colombia's isolated towns, particularly those in Antioquia department. It is in this context that in 1977 embattled rancher Ramon Isaza gathered forces in the sleepy river town of Puerto Boyaca to fight the FARC forces terrorizing his community....

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