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The Devious Art of Securing Influence in Africa

Stephen Rakowski
Sub-Saharan Africa Analyst, Stratfor
Aug 21, 2016 | 13:03 GMT
Hissene Habre (R), then-president of Chad, greets Mobutu Sese Seko (L), then-president of Zaire, on his arrival in Ndjamena on Aug. 20, 1983. For African leaders in charge of poor, weak states, maintaining personal security is a perennial challenge.
Hissene Habre (R), then-president of Chad, greets Mobutu Sese Seko (L), then-president of Zaire, on his arrival in Ndjamena on Aug. 20, 1983. For African leaders in charge of poor, weak states, maintaining personal security is a perennial challenge.
(JOEL ROBINE/AFP/Getty Images)

For countries without colonial interests in Africa, the wave of independence movements offered an opportunity to make inroads in nations outside their traditional spheres of influence. Providing physical security for a leader and his or her family is a particularly useful tool for a country that wants to assert its influence without committing extensive resources....

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