SNAPSHOTS

Lebanon’s Spiral Sets Europe’s Next Migrant Crisis in Motion

MIN READJan 18, 2022 | 22:16 GMT

A protester holds a sign as fuel tankers block a road in Lebanon's capital of Beirut during a general strike by public transport and workers unions on Jan. 13, 2022.

A protester holds a sign as fuel tankers block a road in Lebanon's capital of Beirut during a general strike by public transport and workers unions on Jan. 13, 2022.

(ANWAR AMRO/AFP via Getty Images)

As Lebanon’s economic or political crises continue to spiral, more people living in the country -- including Palestinian and Syrian refugees -- will seek to flee to Europe, potentially creating a new migrant crisis. On Jan. 13, another “day of rage” led by Lebanon’s transport unions highlighted the challenges facing people in the country and the factors compelling an increasing number of them to risk a sea journey to Europe. In protest of skyrocketing fuel prices, the nationwide strikes temporarily crippled transport routes, shut schools and universities, and were accompanied by threats of future violence from some demonstrators. But the strikes were largely ignored by the Lebanese government, which has done little to mitigate the acute fuel crisis, let alone the country’s greater economic collapse. Indeed, by the afternoon of Jan. 13, the rallies had dwindled -- a sign that even protesters themselves saw limited value in them. ...

image of globe

Connected Content

Article Search