SNAPSHOTS

A Military Coup Risks Upending Sudan’s Progress Toward Democracy

MIN READOct 25, 2021 | 20:23 GMT

A protester draped with Sudan’s national flag stands in front of burning tires during a demonstration in Khartoum on Oct. 25, 2021.

A protester draped with Sudan’s national flag stands in front of burning tires during a demonstration in Khartoum on Oct. 25, 2021.

(AFP via Getty Images)

A military coup in Sudan could jeopardize the Northeast African country's transition to democracy by spurring unrest and impeding Khartoum's efforts to achieve debt relief. Sudanese Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok was arrested by security forces in the early morning of Oct. 25 as part of an apparent military takeover of the country’s transitional government. In a televised public address broadcast this afternoon, the head of the military, Gen. Abdel-Fattah Burhan, declared a state of emergency and announced that he was dissolving the joint civilian and military government, which was established in 2019 after the ousting of Sudan’s longtime authoritarian leader Omar al-Bashir. Burhan said political infighting had forced him to intervene in the interest of the Sudanese people. He also pledged to appoint another technocratic government coalition to lead Sudan to democratic elections in July 2023, which is a significantly shorter timeline than the 39-month commitment put forth by the...

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