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Poland and the Baltics Find New Energy Options

Oct 15, 2015 | 09:15 GMT
Lithuania's first liquefied natural gas (LNG) floating terminal docks at the port of Klaipeda, October 2014.
Lithuania's first liquefied natural gas (LNG) floating terminal docks at the port of Klaipeda, October 2014.
(PETRAS MALUKAS/AFP Photo/Getty Images)

The Kremlin may lose influence in Eastern Europe as the region diversifies its energy resources. At an EU summit Oct. 15, Poland and the Baltic states -- Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania -- will sign an agreement to build a natural gas pipeline that will play a key role in integrating their energy networks. The deal comes within a week of the inauguration of a Polish liquefied natural gas (LNG) import terminal in the port city of Swinoujscie and less than year after the opening of a Lithuanian LNG terminal in Klaipeda. These developments symbolize an important evolution in Baltic and Polish efforts to break their dependence on Russian natural gas supplies. While the construction of natural gas pipelines and LNG import infrastructure will not necessarily eliminate Russia as an energy provider to these countries, it will significantly weaken Moscow's ability to use its natural gas as a political tool in the...

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