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Jan 14, 2018 | 16:47 GMT

1 min read

Seven Years After the Arab Spring: A Visual Anthology

A demonstrator offers flowers to soldiers on Jan. 21, 2011, in Tunis during a three-day period of mourning for the people who died during the country's revolution.
(CHRISTOPHER FURLONG/Getty Images)
Editor's Note

Seven years ago, a wave of protests swept throughout the Middle East and North Africa — and rather than fading away, they triggered the massive movement ultimately deemed the Arab Spring. The violence, revolutions and multiple civil wars that followed reshaped the entire region.

The Arab Spring's place of origin was Tunisia, a country that emerged from its Jasmine Revolution as a civil-led government with representation from Islamist and secular parties. But the protests spread to more than a dozen countries in the region, taking particularly powerful hold in Egypt, Libya, Bahrain, Syria and Yemen. In this visual anthology, we take a look back at some of the memorable images from the Arab Spring demonstrations and their aftermath.

A Tunis resident throws a stone while a police officer shoots a tear gas canister on Jan. 26, 2011 in front of former Prime Minister Mohammed Ghannouchi's office.

A Tunis resident throws a stone while a police officer shoots a tear gas canister on Jan. 26, 2011 in front of former Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi's office. Pressure from protests against former Tunisian President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali throughout December 2010 and January 2011 forced the removal of Ben Ali's government on Jan. 14, 2011.

(FETHI BELAID/AFP/Getty Images)
Protesters, one holding bread, shout slogans to show their solidarity with the residents of the Tunisian city of Sidi Bouzid during a demonstration on Dec. 27, 2010 in Tunis.

Protesters, one holding bread, shout slogans to show their solidarity with the residents of the Tunisian city of Sidi Bouzid during a demonstration on Dec. 27, 2010 in Tunis. Sidi Bouzid was the city where Tunisia's Jasmine Revolution first began in December 2010, after street vendor Mohamed Bouazizi's self-immolation prompted riots and demonstrations against the government.

(FETHI BELAID/AFP/Getty Images)
A man cuts himself with scissors during protests on Jan. 25 outside the Tunisian Interior Ministry in the government square in Tunis.

A man cuts himself with scissors during protests on Jan. 25 outside the Tunisian Interior Ministry in the government square in Tunis. Some of the main drivers behind the Jasmine Revolution were unemployment and poor living conditions. Seven years later, Tunisia is still struggling with these issues.

(CHRISTOPHER FURLONG/Getty Images)
A protester offers flowers to soldiers on Jan. 21, 2011 in Tunis during a three-day period of mourning for the people who died during the country's revolution.

A protester offers flowers to soldiers on Jan. 21, 2011 in Tunis during a three-day period of mourning for the people who died during the country's revolution. Tunisia emerged from the Arab Spring not without substantial struggles, but its military does not wield political power and its constitution is focused on citizen's rights.

(CHRISTOPHER FURLONG/Getty Images)
A protester pleads with soldiers to allow her through the razor wire barricade outside the Tunisian prime minister's office on Jan. 24, 2011 in Tunis.

A protester pleads with soldiers to allow her through the razor wire barricade outside the Tunisian prime minister's office on Jan. 24, 2011 in Tunis. Protesters walked overnight from Sidi Bouzid to descend on the prime minister's office, where they tore down barricades. In the years since the Arab Spring, protests during the month of January have been common in Tunisia.

(CHRISTOPHER FURLONG/Getty Images)
A protester in Tahrir Square holds a photo showing former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's face crossed out on Jan. 29, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt during the Egyptian Revolution.

A protester in Tahrir Square holds a photo showing former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's face crossed out on Jan. 29, 2011, in Cairo during the Egyptian Revolution. The events of the Jasmine Revolution in Tunisia inspired demonstrations throughout several countries in North Africa and the Middle East.

(PETER MACDIARMID/Getty Images)
Tens of thousands of protesters gather in Cairo's Tahrir Square on Feb. 1, 2011, demanding Mubarak's ouster.

Tens of thousands of protesters gather in Cairo's Tahrir Square on Feb. 1, 2011, demanding Mubarak's ouster. After 18 days of protests, Mubarak stepped down on Feb. 11, 2011, and transferred power to Egypt's Supreme Council of the Armed Forces. In the seven years since the Arab Spring, the military has been Egypt's main power broker.

(PETER MACDIARMID/Getty Images)
Anti-government protesters demonstrate at the Pearl Roundabout in Manama, Bahrain, on Feb. 20, 2011.

Anti-government protesters demonstrate at the Pearl Roundabout in Manama, Bahrain, on Feb. 20, 2011. Demonstrators calling for reform gathered by the thousands in the roundabout for months, despite violence and security crackdowns, and ongoing protests continued throughout the country until 2014. Demonstrations are currently kept under control in Bahrain through force, sweeping arrests and tight control of the media.

(JOHN MOORE/Getty Images)
A Libyan rebel scans the frontline as a facility burns near Ras Lanuf, Libya on March 9, 2011, less than a month after anti-government protests began on Feb. 15.

A Libyan rebel scans the frontline as a facility burns near Ras Lanuf, Libya on March 9, 2011, less than a month after anti-government protests began on Feb. 15. By mid-March, the Libyan civil war was underway and the rebels had pushed government troops loyal to former Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi toward Bin Jawad. Gadhafi was captured and killed in October 2011 and, today, Libya is host to three competing factions, each with its own militia.

(JOHN MOORE/Getty Images)
Syrians in Damascus on March 29, 2011, wave their national flag and hold portraits of President Bashar al Assad during a rally to show support for their leader in the wake of dissent.

Syrians in Damascus on March 29, 2011, wave their national flag and hold portraits of President Bashar al Assad during a rally to show support for their leader in the wake of dissent. Anti-government protests evolved into the ongoing Syrian civil war, which has become a proxy battleground for foreign parties including the United States, Turkey, Iran and Russia.

(ANWAR AMRO/AFP/Getty Images)

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