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What Does the End of the INF Treaty Mean for Europe?

Feb 25, 2019 | 10:00 GMT
Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev speaks in front of U.S. President Ronald Reagan during a welcoming ceremony at the White House on the first day of a disarmament summit on Dec. 8, 1987.

Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev speaks in front of U.S. President Ronald Reagan during a welcoming ceremony at the White House on the first day of a disarmament summit on Dec. 8, 1987. Proliferation appears likely now that the United States has torn up the INF Treaty.

(JEROME DELAY/AFP/Getty Images)

The Cold War ended in Europe almost three decades ago, but many on the Continent are none too happy about the end to one of the last vestiges of that battle, the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty. The treaty between the United States and the Soviet Union (and, subsequently, its Russian successor) imposed limits on the destructive nuclear strength that Moscow could train on Europe's NATO members, as well as the force with which the West could threaten Russia. But now that the United States has suspended the treaty, proliferation -- as well as more instability in Europe -- might be on the cards again....

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