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A Year After the Military Coup, Is Sudan Any Closer to a Power-Sharing Deal?

MIN READOct 26, 2022 | 20:47 GMT

Demonstrators march in a protest in the area south of Sudan's capital Khartoum on Oct. 25, 2022, on the first anniversary of the military coup.

Demonstrators march in a protest in the area south of Sudan's capital Khartoum on Oct. 25, 2022, on the first anniversary of the military coup.

(AFP via Getty Images)

The Sudanese military and civilian political coalitions appear to be nearing a draft constitution deal, but civilian resistance groups' refusal to make concessions to the military may mean that violent unrest and political volatility persist even if an agreement is reached. Thousands of Sudanese took to the streets on Oct. 25, marking the one-year anniversary of the military coup that installed Abdel Fattah al-Burhan as the country's transitional president. Despite an intermittent nationwide internet blackout, videos on social media showed protesters marching to the presidential palace and confronting security forces. Since the military took power, civilian resistance committees have staged weekly protests demanding a return to democratic rule, to which security forces have responded with tear gas, arrests, beatings and live fire. Under increasing international pressure to account for security abuses, Burhan announced in July that the military would cede power if civilian political groups and resistance forces reach an...

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