For more targeted results combine or exclude search terms by applying the Boolean Operators AND, OR and AND NOT. Place quotations around your search term to find documents that contain that exact phrase
41 Results
Search in Text
Search in Title

Showing 41 results for Baidu sorted by

Search Tools

On GeopoliticsNov 1, 2019 | 09:30 GMT
The national flags of China and the United States.
By Mixing Tech and Human Rights Sanctions on China, the White House Crosses the Rubicon
Conspicuously absent from an emerging China-U.S. trade truce is the outstanding issue of U.S. export restrictions against Huawei. The omission reveals an uncomfortable and growing reality for U.S. tech firms: Politically convenient trade truces will come and go, but the strategic competition between the United States and China is deepening. Technology is a fundamental component of this broader rivalry, which also makes it a radioactive element in the trade talks and a prime target for China hawks advocating a decoupling of the U.S. and Chinese economies. At this stage of the competition, national security, human rights and sovereignty are getting mashed together along with American public attitudes on how to contend with China when it comes to shaping U.S. policy. As a result, the political room to negotiate on an issue like Huawei is narrowing by the day, driving a more hard-line U.S. policy toward China overall.
READ MORE
AssessmentsOct 1, 2018 | 09:00 GMT
An employee works on a Volkswagen e-Golf electric automobile on the assembly line inside a factory on May 8 in Dresden, Germany.
Electric Vehicles Reach a Crossroads
The global automobile sector stands at the intersection of three major geopolitical trends: shifting trade dynamics, the transportation revolution and the rise of China as a technological competitor to the United States. In the short term, automobiles represent a key focus of the Trump administration, which has proposed measures that would target foreign cars with tariff barriers. Steel and aluminum tariffs, combined with extensive tariffs levied against China (as well as Beijing's retaliation to the United States), have the potential to disrupt supply chains and increase component costs. As electric vehicles themselves alter automobile markets over the coming decade, partnerships will be crucial to reducing developmental costs and standardizing components. And though the U.S. auto market will remain one of the world's largest, it will be dwarfed by the market opportunities that will emerge as demand for electric vehicles climbs in China, especially if a protracted trade battle limits access
READ MORE
AssessmentsSep 28, 2018 | 10:00 GMT
Rows of solar panels are seen at a Tekno Ray Solar farm on Sept. 13, 2018, in Konya, Turkey.
Why More Global Corporations Are Betting on Renewables
Facebook recently heralded that it will source 100 percent of its electricity consumption from renewables by 2020, representing the latest direct renewables purchase by a major global corporation. The social media site joins Apple and Google, which already power all their operations using renewable electricity. But while Silicon Valley's giants are clearly among the leaders in embracing green electricity, other industrial and commercial segments are not far behind. The materials segment, including metals, is the largest consumer of directly sourced renewable electricity. For instance, metals giant Alcoa sources 75 percent of the energy required for its smelters from renewables, while mining giant Rio Tinto acquires just under half of its energy from such sources. In telecommunications, AT&T and T-Mobile are pursuing aggressive renewables plans, and there are others on the cutting edge in retail, including Wal-Mart, Ikea, Nike and Starbucks. Volkswagen, in turn, leads the way for renewables in manufacturing
READ MORE
AssessmentsSep 14, 2018 | 09:00 GMT
A container ship is docked at the Mexican port of Lazaro Cardenas in Michoacan state on April 4, 2017.
Can Blockchain Technology Bring Smooth Seas to Global Shipping?
There are a handful of technologies that, if widely adopted, have the potential to revolutionize how the world works. Distributed ledger technology is one such invention, and shipping is an industry that would obviously benefit from adopting blockchain and other distributed ledger technologies. Given shipping's struggles and its vulnerability to geopolitical risk, creating a transparent, distributed ledger that would remove middlemen and increase efficiencies could help the industry evolve and improve economically. To reap the benefits, however, the constraints of widespread adoption must be overcome. This challenge highlights a broader struggle to influence global standards across many emerging technologies, a struggle that often pits the United States (more broadly the West) against China. The use of blockchain in global shipping is no different.
READ MORE
On GeopoliticsAug 2, 2018 | 09:00 GMT
The Chinese and U.S. flags are seen during a promotional event in Beijing on June 30, 2017.
AI and the Return of Great Power Competition
For better or worse, the advancement and diffusion of artificial intelligence technology will come to define this century. Whether that statement should fill your soul with terror or delight remains a matter of intense debate. Techno-idealists and doomsdayers will paint their respective utopian and dystopian visions of machine-kind, making the leap from what we know now as "narrow AI" to "general AI" to surpass human cognition within our lifetime. On the opposite end of the spectrum, yawning skeptics will point to Siri's slow intellect and Capt. Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger's human instinct to wave off AI chatter as a heap of hype not worth losing sleep over. The fact is that the development of AI – a catch-all term that encompasses neural networks and machine learning and deep learning technologies – has the potential to fundamentally transform civilian and military life in the coming decades. Regardless of whether you're a businessman pondering
READ MORE
AssessmentsJul 18, 2018 | 19:48 GMT
In this August 2017 photo, a man walks past an ad in Hong Kong's international airport for the social media platform WeChat, which is owned by China's Tencent.
Chinese Internet Companies Sharpen Their Competition at Home to Better Compete Abroad
Chinese e-commerce startup Pinduoduo is seeking between $16 and $19 per share in its upcoming initial public offering on the Nasdaq stock market, according to its latest U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filing on July 16. At the upper end of that range, Pinduoduo would gather $1.63 billion in funding from the IPO and would see a valuation at about $24 billion. Pinduoduo is one of China's rising e-commerce companies, and major stakeholder Tencent hopes it can leverage it in its competition against rival Alibaba.
READ MORE
On GeopoliticsJun 28, 2018 | 19:11 GMT
Conference attendees walk past a booth for Chinese telecommunications company at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain. Huawei has not drawn the concern in Europe that it has in the United States.
Huawei's Success Puts It in Washington's Sights
Few companies play such an outsized role in geopolitics as Huawei, which has become a global leader in the development of several key technologies, including 5G telecommunications infrastructure. Despite more than a decade worth of efforts, however, Huawei has struggled to break into the U.S. market in the face of near-constant resistance. Allegations that the company has stolen U.S. technology have combined with suspicions over its ambiguous ties to the Chinese Communist Party and the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) to drive bipartisan political opposition to its U.S. ambitions. The unwanted attention from Washington, however, will do little to hinder Huawei’s global rise -- or reduce its importance to Beijing.
READ MORE
AssessmentsJun 20, 2018 | 09:00 GMT
A demonstrator shows support for the Chinese government at a counterprotest held in response to an Amnesty International demonstration over human rights abuses and online censorship in China.
Bending the Internet: China Weighs Commercial Growth Against Government Control
Beijing considers the internet an opportunity as much as a threat. The economic incentive to keep the it free enough to foster innovation is huge for China. Some of the world's most technologically proficient internet and tech firms, in fact, operate behind the "Great Firewall." The rise of companies such as Baidu, Alibaba and Tencent has helped sustain China's economic growth, and their continued success is a central component in the country's long-term online strategy, dubbed Internet Plus by Chinese Premier Li Keqiang.
READ MORE
Quarterly ForecastsJun 10, 2018 | 23:18 GMT
Stratfor's 2018 Third-Quarter Forecast, looking ahead at the coming months.
2018 Third-Quarter Forecast
It promises to be an especially fractious quarter as the United States continues to spar not only with adversaries but allies as well. The simmering trade dispute with China will continue, Russia will struggle to break its stalemate with the West, Europe has a litany of problems to address, and anything could happen on the Korean Peninsula.
READ MORE
On GeopoliticsMay 3, 2018 | 14:00 GMT
The latest social media scandals have generated a backlash in the United States among internet users who want greater control over their personal data. But AI runs on data. AI algorithms use robust sets of data to learn, honing their pattern recognition and prediction abilities. And much of that data comes from individuals.
AI Makes Personal Privacy a Matter of National Strategy
It seems that hardly a 24-hour news cycle passes without a story about the latest social media controversy. We worry about who has our information, who knows our buying habits or searching habits, and who may be turning that information into targeted ads for products or politicians. Calls for stricter control and protection of privacy and for greater transparency follow. Europe will implement a new set of privacy regulations later this month -- the culmination of a yearslong negotiating process and a move that could ease the way for similar policies in the United States, however eventually. Individuals, meanwhile, may take their own steps to guard their data. The implications of that reaction could reverberate far beyond our laptops or smartphones. It will handicap the United States in the next leg of the technology race with China.
READ MORE
AssessmentsMar 20, 2018 | 15:16 GMT
China's tech giants see Southeast Asia as a market ready for development.
China's Tech Giants Are Racing the West Into Southeast Asia
China's tech giants are drawing a line in the sand in Southeast Asia. From internet heavyweight Alibaba to smartphone maker Xiaomi, Chinese companies have singled out the region as a critical market to push back against their Japanese, South Korean and U.S. rivals. The 10 countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) have a population of more than 620 million. And whoever can cultivate the region through smartphone adoption, internet commerce and other spreading technologies will have prime access to one of the world's most important generators of growth over the next two decades.
READ MORE
On GeopoliticsFeb 6, 2018 | 21:15 GMT
Jia Jia, a lifelike robot created by Chinese engineers, demonstrates at least one of her facial expressions at a conference in Shanghai on Jan. 9, 2017.
The Coming Tech War With China
The United States is already in the middle of its next great war -- even if it's only just starting to realize it. In the latest National Security Strategy, the White House highlighted China's growing technological prowess as a threat to U.S. economic and military might. The Asian powerhouse has taken on a leading role in several critical emerging technologies. Five years ago, by contrast, it was widely perceived as an imitator in technology, not an innovator. As hard as it may be for Washington to admit, China is catching up in the tech race. The question now is whether tech firms in the United States, a country that embraces private enterprise and a free economy, will be able to keep up with their Chinese counterparts' breakthroughs.
READ MORE
Stratfor Worldview

OUR COMMITMENT

To empower members to confidently understand and navigate a continuously changing and complex global environment.