For more targeted results combine or exclude search terms by applying the Boolean Operators AND, OR and AND NOT. Place quotations around your search term to find documents that contain that exact phrase
707 Results
Search in Text
Search in Title

Showing 707 results for Shaked sorted by

Search Tools

AssessmentsAug 4, 2020 | 10:00 GMT
Plainclothed Belarus' security forces and riot police officers detain a protester at an opposition demonstration in Minsk, Belarus, on July 14, 2020.
In Belarus, an Election Fuels the Fight for Russia's Borderlands
The likely tumultuous aftermath of Belarus's upcoming presidential election could significantly shake up the balance of power in the strategic borderland region between Russia and Western Europe. Amid the growing popularity of opposition movements in Belarus, the outcome of the country's Aug. 9 presidential election is widely expected to be heavily contested. The likely emergence of post-election protests will cast doubt over President Alexander Lukashenko's grasp on power and could open the door to a potential regime change. Belarus's importance to Russia's external security strategy will make Moscow extremely invested in the outcome of any power struggle in the country, which could prompt Russia to intervene directly.
READ MORE
SnapshotsJul 7, 2020 | 10:00 GMT
A Drought Lays Bare Morocco’s Vulnerabilities
While declining rainfall is a problem across the Maghreb region of northwest Africa, this year's ongoing spring and summer drought is hitting Morocco's agricultural sector particularly hard. The drought will weaken the strategic objectives of the Moroccan government's agricultural investment plan, which prioritizes support for export-producing large farms over subsistence-producing small farms in order to drum up valuable export revenue. Dampened domestic production will also force Morocco to import more staple crops needed to feed its 36 million citizens. Combined with the loss of crucial agricultural revenue, the added expense of more imports will exacerbate the economic fallout from the COVID-19 crisis, which is already sapping Morocco's tourism revenue.
READ MORE
AssessmentsMay 15, 2020 | 10:00 GMT
Iraqi Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi makes a speech in Baghdad on May 6, 2020. The following day, Iraq's parliament granted a vote of confidence to al-Kadhimi’s new government and swore in a majority of his 22 ministers.
A Monumental Task Awaits Iraq’s New Government
On May 7, Iraq swore in its first legitimate government since violent protests led to the collapse of its last government in December. After months of political turmoil, the formation of the new government, led by former intelligence chief Mustafa al-Kadhimi as prime minister, is in itself an achievement. But no matter how coherent al-Kadhimi’s administration proves to be, Iraq’s increasingly dire economic situation -- made worse by the COVID-19 crisis and subsequent oil market shocks -- will make it difficult to maintain social and political stability, as well as manage domestic and external security. 
READ MORE
On GeopoliticsMay 10, 2020 | 10:00 GMT
A mother takes photos with her baby under cherry blossoms in full bloom in Tokyo, Japan, on March 29, 2015.
The Geopolitics of Postmodern Parenting
During the two months I recently spent away from work to fulfill my demographic duty, I found that most of my conversations with visitors followed the same pattern. The talk quickly turned from the standard cooing over my baby girl to an intensive debate over parental leave: how much time and flexibility to grant new parents in the workforce, how to reconcile career ambitions with the responsibilities of human procreation, how to compensate for the crazy cost of child care and how to boost birthrates. As a white-collar, taxpaying working mother in the United States, I had become one of the statistics I used to pore over as an analyst pondering the implications of aging and shrinking populations. But you don't have to be a parent -- or an analyst, for that matter -- to care about this stuff. In fact, a lot of the global angst today over stagnant economic
READ MORE
AssessmentsApr 22, 2020 | 10:00 GMT
People wearing masks gather in a granite quarry in Antananarivo, Madagascar, for an Easter celebration while practicing social distancing on April 12, 2020. The capital city has been on lockdown since March 23 to curb the spread of COVID-19.
COVID-19 Shakes Up Southern Africa’s Mining Sector
Current COVID-19 disruptions may provide only a short-term challenge for Southern Africa's lucrative mining operations. But they will come just ahead of a longer-term blow to revenue caused by the pandemic-induced global recession and the subsequent drops in demand for mineral resources. After soaring throughout 2019, platinum prices, for example, have already dropped roughly 20 percent since the beginning of the year. Meanwhile, the world’s largest producer of platinum, South Africa, has been forced to shutter its massive mining sector in the hopes of containing its own fast-evolving outbreak. Some countries such as Tanzania and Namibia have managed to benefit from the new influx of export traffic afforded by South Africa’s COVID-19 crisis. But it may be only a matter of time before widespread outbreaks force more mining firms across the region to choose between securing their profit lines or the safety of their workers. Regardless of the direct health impacts, however, steep losses
READ MORE
AssessmentsApr 8, 2020 | 18:16 GMT
A 3D rendering of the novel coronavirus floating in a cellular environment.
COVID-19: Frequently Asked Questions About Getting Back to Work
To help clients sift through the growing sea of COVID-19 information, RANE pulsed its network of experts to level set what should be top of mind for businesses and individuals as the pandemic unfolds. Stratfor’s geopolitical content and analysis will soon be available through RANE’s platform, where members receive exclusive access to a global marketplace of credentialed risk experts and service providers, proprietary community-driven risk intelligence, and a range of support services and risk management programs. For more information about RANE and Stratfor, visit https://go.ranenetwork.com/stratfor/rane.  This FAQ covers the following questions: What do we now know about this illness and who gets it? How can individuals best protect themselves? Do I need to worry about people getting infected by the virus living on things they touch? What do we do if someone shows symptoms while in the workplace? What can I do to mitigate the risk of being shut down by health authorities? How does this end?
READ MORE
AssessmentsFeb 25, 2020 | 20:10 GMT
Kuwaiti Health Minister Sheikh Basel al-Sabah, right, speaks with the media on Feb. 22, 2020, as officials at the Kuwait City airport prepare to take Kuwaitis returning from Iran to a hospital to be tested for the COVID-19 virus.
Iran Is in the Eye of the Coronavirus Storm
With cases in a half-dozen Middle Eastern countries that originated from travel within its borders, Iran has emerged as a regional epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak that causes the respiratory illness the World Health Organization calls COVID-19 just as global fears of a pandemic are amplifying. Not only are there clear negative impacts for Iran politically and economically as well as potential negative economic and health impacts for the surrounding region, depending on how Iran manages the internal and external information flow, the outbreak could also harm and/or help Tehran's already fragile foreign friendships, should it compel Tehran to reach out to the broader world for more help.
READ MORE
AssessmentsJan 7, 2020 | 10:30 GMT
Lava rises to the top inside Erta Ale volcano in the Afar region of northeastern Ethiopia. The Ethiopian volcano is home to the world's oldest continuously active lava lake, known as the "Gateway To Hell."
Unlocking the Power of Potash in the Horn of Africa
Following their recent peace deal, Ethiopia and Eritrea are seeking to take advantage of the region's newfound foreign investment interest by tapping into long-ignored natural resources under their soil. One of the most promising resources is potash, a mined salt containing water-soluble potassium that is most often used in fertilizer. High-grade potash reserves split between Ethiopia and neighboring Eritrea are likely worth well into the hundreds of millions of dollars, if not much more. And with global fertilizer demand set to skyrocket in the years ahead, the opening of the region's market couldn't come at a more opportune time. But whether the two countries will be able to turn that promise into profit remains far from certain, as foreign investors may deem the countries' political futures too murky -- and the security challenges still too steep -- despite the possible returns.
READ MORE
AssessmentsDec 13, 2019 | 10:30 GMT
French soldiers patrol the Tofa Gala forest in northern Burkina Faso on Nov. 9, 2019.
The West Offers Little Reprieve to the Sahel's Jihadist Battle
As Western security efforts struggle to keep militants from exploiting local vacuums in governance in the Sahel, escalating jihadist violence across the region shows no sign of slowing down. France has led the counterterrorism charge in the Sahel since its 2013 intervention in Mali to halt an emerging jihadist offensive. But those gains have been slowly and surely slipping away, as the insurgent threat has now morphed into a complex mess of ethnic and religious insurrections throughout most of Mali, and well into Burkina Faso and Niger. In fending off this increasingly formidable threat, however, France largely has been left to go it alone. Local military forces aren't adequately equipped to fight off the insurgents, and other Western countries with smaller operations in the region, such as the United States, have been hesitant to pick up the slack. But without any additional help, the security situation in the Sahel will inevitably worsen. And
READ MORE
AssessmentsNov 18, 2019 | 10:00 GMT
Color satellite image of the Niger Delta region in Nigeria. The city of Lagos, the second-most populous city in Africa, can be seen west of the river on the Atlantic coast.
Nigeria's Risky New Oil Revenue Plan
Life just got harder for major oil companies operating off the coast of Nigeria. On Nov. 4, Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari signed a law updating the terms of the country’s production-sharing contracts that, among other changes, increase royalties on international oil firms. As Africa's top crude producer, Nigeria is almost entirely financially dependent on its petroleum operations, which account for 90 percent of government revenue. The current oil glut has thus hurt Nigeria's pocketbooks particularly hard, forcing it to consider drastic measures to squeeze out more money from its growing offshore operations. But by placing international companies in its crosshairs, Nigeria instead risks driving away the crucial deep-water investments in needs to keep its lights on.
READ MORE
Contributor PerspectivesNov 14, 2019 | 16:20 GMT
Konigsberg Cathedral and the Pregolya River are seen in this nighttime shot in Kaliningrad.
Kaliningrad: Measuring Up Against Europe, Not Mainland Russia
Sandwiched between European Union members Poland and Lithuania, Kaliningrad, Russia's westernmost outpost, has always been of great interest for many -- and not just because of its military significance and motley, centuries-old history. Indeed, the territory that is now Kaliningrad has been ruled at various times by the Teutonic Order, Prussia, imperialist Germany, the Soviets and, finally, Russia. For many who recall the Soviet past and live just a hop, skip and a jump away, the exclave is magnetic for its proximity and the preservation of the relics of the Soviet past. But once you're in Kaliningrad, "Russian" isn't quite the description that many want to hear, as it's a territory that looks more toward Europe than Russia.
READ MORE
Stratfor Worldview

OUR COMMITMENT

To empower members to confidently understand and navigate a continuously changing and complex global environment.