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Showing 288 results for Hangzhou Hikvision Digital Technology sorted by

AssessmentsJul 15, 2020 | 10:00 GMT
A view of Huawei’s U.K. headquarters in Reading, England.
In a Win for the U.S., the U.K. Moves to Oust Huawei From Its 5G Rollout
The United Kingdom's move to oust Chinese tech giant Huawei from its telecommunications networks in the coming years will not only impede the country's 5G rollout, but will further dim hopes for a U.K.-China trade deal that could help London expand its economic relationships beyond Europe post-Brexit. But the decision nonetheless marks a significant victory for the United States, which has been pressuring its European allies to purge Huawei from their 5G infrastructure -- especially if the British ban ends up being replicated elsewhere on the Continent.  
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AssessmentsJul 1, 2020 | 10:00 GMT
An image depicts waving Chinese and Indian flags overlaying a map of the world.
In India, Anti-China Anger Will Bring Out Modi's Hawkish Side
A surge of anti-China sentiment among Indian lawmakers, business leaders and voters will prompt Prime Minister Narendra Modi to take a more aggressive approach against Bejing in the wake of the two countries' recent border clash. This could include a variety of actions ranging from diplomatic moves to economic and trade measures, as well as a continued military build-up against China, which will only further ratchet up tensions between the nuclear-armed neighbors. 
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AssessmentsJun 16, 2020 | 10:00 GMT
An image depicting the global economy.
Trump’s War Against Taxing Tech Goes Global
With international negotiations stalled, many governments are choosing to unilaterally implement digital services taxes (DSTs). The United States -- which is home to the majority of tech giants that would be subject to such taxes, including Amazon, Apple and Google -- is using the threat of tariffs to both limit the global expansion of DSTs and push international negotiations toward the proposed reforms it backs. But with so many countries against Washington's preferred outcome, which critics say would allow U.S. tech companies to opt out of tax obligations in international markets, the risk of negotiations failing to reach an agreement this year is high, as is the risk of the United States implementing tariffs on its growing number of trade partners implementing DSTs. 
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AssessmentsMay 5, 2020 | 10:00 GMT
Containers sit stacked on a cargo ship berthed at China’s Zhoushan Port on Feb. 4, 2020.
COVID-19 Will Leave a Lasting Mark on the Shipping Industry
By sapping global economic growth and emboldening nationalist calls against globalization, the COVID-19 crisis risks upending the past 30 years of rising intercontinental trade volumes. Countries have implemented various new shipping restrictions to contain the virus, though pandemic-induced declines in demand have so far prevented severe disruptions. But with the global recession likely to extend well into 2021, the long-term loss of business -- exacerbated by a surge in U.S.-China trade tensions and security concerns over global supply chains -- could cripple the shipping industry for years to come. In the meantime, the oversupply of container shipping capacity will force companies around the world to consolidate as their governments increasingly opt for more protectionist policies.
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AssessmentsFeb 7, 2020 | 10:00 GMT
An employee sits in the showroom of an Apple store in Beijing after it closed for the day on Feb. 1, 2020.
The Coronavirus Spreads Fears of a Shutdown in China's Tech Sector
Without question, the new coronavirus has taken a toll on China and many other places in the world, infecting at least 30,600 people and killing 633 as of Feb. 7. But only now, as the Lunar New Year holiday draws to a close, is Beijing preparing to assess just how much economic damage the coronavirus outbreak has wrought, especially as China is central to the global electronics and information technology sector. Ultimately, the breadth of the impact depends on how far the virus spreads beyond its current location. Hubei province and its capital, Wuhan, are not critical nodes for the vast majority of China's electronics sector. But neighboring provinces, including Shaanxi, Henan and Jiangxi, are home to cities that are prominent in the global technology sector, while the provinces with the second and third most confirmed cases so far, Zhejiang and Guangdong, are arguably China's two most critical areas for tech.
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AssessmentsJan 28, 2020 | 17:36 GMT
Environmentalists stage a protest against a World Economic Forum briefing meeting in Brussels on Jan. 27, 2020.
For the Global Economy, a Sluggish 2020 Awaits
For the global economy in the year ahead, challenges won’t be far away, with uncertainty from unpredictable policymaking on trade and investment, coupled with potential geopolitical disruptions and financial vulnerabilities, leading the way. And if these risks come to pass, the world's leading economies will be hard-pressed to respond in a coordinated, effective manner. Already, international cooperation is frayed as countries look increasingly inward, while slower growth with stagnant incomes could encourage even more economic nationalism than exists at present. Ultimately, the host of threats presents the world's policymakers with a tricky path toward safeguarding growth in the global economy.
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On SecurityDec 17, 2019 | 08:00 GMT
A man wearing a gas mask runs from a clash with police in Santiago, Chile, during a protest on Dec. 10, 2019.
Threat Lens 2020 Annual Forecast: An Excerpt
From disruptive protests in Hong Kong and across Latin America to Russia and China's increasingly sophisticated espionage tactics, Western companies and individuals will face a number of threats in 2020. Take a look at an excerpt of our Threat Lens Annual Forecast to learn about everything on our security radar for the year to come. A full version of the threats we expect in 2020 is available to Threat Lens subscribers.
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AssessmentsDec 2, 2019 | 10:00 GMT
Russian 1,000-ruble banknotes are printed at the Moscow Printing Factory owned by Goznak.
In 2020, Russia's Biggest Enemy Will Be Its Own Economic Stagnation
In 2020, Russia's internal focus will be its economic performance, as President Vladimir Putin's United Russia party strives to avoid challengers in upcoming elections in 2021 and 2024. Under economic stagnation, limited purchasing power has threatened the living standards of the Russian electorate and risks invigorating political opposition. Russia has launched numerous initiatives to reignite its economic growth, but the country is under significant external pressure and facing internal bureaucratic and systemic economic challenges, so their intended effects are not guaranteed.
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Contributor PerspectivesNov 12, 2019 | 10:00 GMT
This Aug. 7, 2018, photo shows a Google office building in Beijing.
Google's AI Work in China Stirs Questions of Allegiance and National Security
China is zealously protective of its national interests and is stealing as much intellectual property as possible from the United States, quickly catching up with decades of incredible innovation and investment in advanced technologies at a fraction of the time and cost. Some of these technologies, such as artificial intelligence, could be game-changers in the balance of world power. What does this ultimately mean for American tech giants like Google that are working cooperatively with Beijing while avoiding military contracts at home, and how should the United States protect its own disruptive innovation and technological advancement from exploitation by the Chinese military through replication and fusion between public and private entities?
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AssessmentsNov 11, 2019 | 09:45 GMT
The European Commission's president-elect, Ursula von der Leyen, talks to the media during the unveiling of her new team for the 2019-2024 term. A graphic showing the specific commissioners is displayed on a large screen behind her.
What a New Commission Means for EU Policy
A new European Commission led by President Ursula von der Leyen is slated to take over in December after the European Parliament approves her team later this month. In preparation for her new post, von der Leyen has outlined a bold "geopolitical" vision that focuses on defending the European Union's interests amid growing competition among global powers like the United States and China. But whether the president-elect's commissioners will actually be able to follow through on her big plans once they take office next month will prove a far different story, as they'll be forced to work within the confines of the continent's increasingly divisive political climate and gloomy economic forecast. 
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On SecurityNov 5, 2019 | 10:00 GMT
Former U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announces the creation of a new initiative to crack down on Chinese intelligence officials stealing intellectual property from U.S. corporations through hacking and espionage during a press conference at the Justice Department on Nov. 1, 2018.
An Era of Unparalleled Espionage Risk Is Upon Us
Today, corporate espionage actors are busier and more successful than ever thanks to an alarming confluence of factors. China's and Russia's escalating great power competition with the United States, for one, is pushing them to more boldly and brazenly obtain Western companies' secrets. But the simultaneous proliferation of espionage tools, mobile devices, digital data and postmodernist thought has also made it so that even a low-level employee can now feasibly have both the means and motive to find and steal massive quantities of information.  All of these threats are formidable in their own right, and thus worthy of attention. But it's equally crucial to understand how they all tie together to fully capture the increasingly dire and incredibly multifaceted espionage risk facing today's businesses and organizations.
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On GeopoliticsNov 1, 2019 | 09:30 GMT
The national flags of China and the United States.
By Mixing Tech and Human Rights Sanctions on China, the White House Crosses the Rubicon
Conspicuously absent from an emerging China-U.S. trade truce is the outstanding issue of U.S. export restrictions against Huawei. The omission reveals an uncomfortable and growing reality for U.S. tech firms: Politically convenient trade truces will come and go, but the strategic competition between the United States and China is deepening. Technology is a fundamental component of this broader rivalry, which also makes it a radioactive element in the trade talks and a prime target for China hawks advocating a decoupling of the U.S. and Chinese economies. At this stage of the competition, national security, human rights and sovereignty are getting mashed together along with American public attitudes on how to contend with China when it comes to shaping U.S. policy. As a result, the political room to negotiate on an issue like Huawei is narrowing by the day, driving a more hard-line U.S. policy toward China overall.
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