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Showing 455 results for Zhejiang Dahua Technology Co sorted by

SnapshotsMay 12, 2020 | 16:09 GMT
COVID-19 Puts EU Defense Spending in Doubt
On May 12, the chief executive of the European Defence Agency, Jiri Sedivy, said the bloc will probably reduce defense spending in its budget for the 2021-2027 period as EU governments focus their resources on dealing with the economic fallout from the pandemic. After the 2016 Brexit referendum, a group of countries led by France pushed for deeper defense cooperation in the European Union to reduce the bloc’s military reliance on the United States, streamline defense spending by pooling resources, and better prepare Europe for geopolitical challenges in the 21st century, which include an emerging China and a potentially aggressive Russia. But Europe’s deepening recession due to COVID-19 has now put these plans in doubt as governments increasingly prioritize stimulus measures, such as granting cheap loans for companies and providing greater financial assistance to low-income households.
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On GeopoliticsMay 10, 2020 | 10:00 GMT
A mother takes photos with her baby under cherry blossoms in full bloom in Tokyo, Japan, on March 29, 2015.
The Geopolitics of Postmodern Parenting
During the two months I recently spent away from work to fulfill my demographic duty, I found that most of my conversations with visitors followed the same pattern. The talk quickly turned from the standard cooing over my baby girl to an intensive debate over parental leave: how much time and flexibility to grant new parents in the workforce, how to reconcile career ambitions with the responsibilities of human procreation, how to compensate for the crazy cost of child care and how to boost birthrates. As a white-collar, taxpaying working mother in the United States, I had become one of the statistics I used to pore over as an analyst pondering the implications of aging and shrinking populations. But you don't have to be a parent -- or an analyst, for that matter -- to care about this stuff. In fact, a lot of the global angst today over stagnant economic
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AssessmentsFeb 7, 2020 | 10:00 GMT
An employee sits in the showroom of an Apple store in Beijing after it closed for the day on Feb. 1, 2020.
The Coronavirus Spreads Fears of a Shutdown in China's Tech Sector
Without question, the new coronavirus has taken a toll on China and many other places in the world, infecting at least 30,600 people and killing 633 as of Feb. 7. But only now, as the Lunar New Year holiday draws to a close, is Beijing preparing to assess just how much economic damage the coronavirus outbreak has wrought, especially as China is central to the global electronics and information technology sector. Ultimately, the breadth of the impact depends on how far the virus spreads beyond its current location. Hubei province and its capital, Wuhan, are not critical nodes for the vast majority of China's electronics sector. But neighboring provinces, including Shaanxi, Henan and Jiangxi, are home to cities that are prominent in the global technology sector, while the provinces with the second and third most confirmed cases so far, Zhejiang and Guangdong, are arguably China's two most critical areas for tech.
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Editorial BoardDec 5, 2019 | 16:28 GMT
Edward Perello
Edward Perello

Edward Perello is the principal of Arkurity, a biotech and policy consulting firm conducting research at the interface of public policy, biotechnology, and national and natural security. He is also the lead on food and agriculture at Deep Science Ventures, where he invests in, or develops, applied science companies to transform agriculture. Perello formerly co-founded Desktop Genetics, a provider of CRISPR genome-editing tools, and has expertise in biosecurity policy and biological weapons. He currently serves on the IUCN Synthetic Biology Taskforce and previously worked for the EU Science and Technology section in Washington, D.C., and on the national implementation team at arms control charity, Vertic.

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Contributor PerspectivesNov 12, 2019 | 10:00 GMT
This Aug. 7, 2018, photo shows a Google office building in Beijing.
Google's AI Work in China Stirs Questions of Allegiance and National Security
China is zealously protective of its national interests and is stealing as much intellectual property as possible from the United States, quickly catching up with decades of incredible innovation and investment in advanced technologies at a fraction of the time and cost. Some of these technologies, such as artificial intelligence, could be game-changers in the balance of world power. What does this ultimately mean for American tech giants like Google that are working cooperatively with Beijing while avoiding military contracts at home, and how should the United States protect its own disruptive innovation and technological advancement from exploitation by the Chinese military through replication and fusion between public and private entities?
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On GeopoliticsNov 1, 2019 | 09:30 GMT
The national flags of China and the United States.
By Mixing Tech and Human Rights Sanctions on China, the White House Crosses the Rubicon
Conspicuously absent from an emerging China-U.S. trade truce is the outstanding issue of U.S. export restrictions against Huawei. The omission reveals an uncomfortable and growing reality for U.S. tech firms: Politically convenient trade truces will come and go, but the strategic competition between the United States and China is deepening. Technology is a fundamental component of this broader rivalry, which also makes it a radioactive element in the trade talks and a prime target for China hawks advocating a decoupling of the U.S. and Chinese economies. At this stage of the competition, national security, human rights and sovereignty are getting mashed together along with American public attitudes on how to contend with China when it comes to shaping U.S. policy. As a result, the political room to negotiate on an issue like Huawei is narrowing by the day, driving a more hard-line U.S. policy toward China overall.
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AssessmentsOct 24, 2019 | 17:22 GMT
An image of the Russian flag behind the African continent.
Russia Expands Its Game Plan in Africa
Russia’s strategy to expand its influence in Africa has been underway for two years, though so far it's largely consisted of covert, bilateral activities. But that's slated to change come Oct. 22, when Moscow hosts its first-ever Africa summit in the city of Sochi. The inaugural meeting will provide a platform for Russia to present a more positive view of its approach to Africa, where it can act as an enabler in economic and political affairs. More than 40 African leaders are scheduled so far to attend the two-day event -- many of whom hail from countries Russia has never had exceptionally close relationships with. But Moscow's ability to make inroads with these new nations will be limited by its lack of the massive budget that its Eastern and Western rivals have long leveraged to stake their claim on the continent. Thus Russia's expanded new diplomatic efforts in Africa will likely focus less on offering purely
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Contributor PerspectivesSep 12, 2019 | 09:00 GMT
This June 29, 2015, file image shows the start of construction of the China-Russia east-route natural gas pipeline near Heihe, China.
In Russia's Pivot to Asia, Economic Attraction Lags Hard Power
Russia held the fifth Eastern Economic Forum (EEF) in Vladivostok, its main Far Eastern city on its Pacific coast, on Sept. 4-6. The forum has been held annually since 2015 to showcase Moscow's commitment to the development of its vast Far Eastern areas and closer economic links with Asia. Russia's "turn to the East" began more than a decade ago. In December 2006, Putin convened a meeting of the Kremlin's Security Council, where it was decided to prioritize the development of the Russian Far East, a huge landmass stretching from the Trans-Baikal region to the Pacific Ocean. At this meeting, Putin invoked Russia's perennial fear of losing its Asian periphery, stressing that the underdevelopment of the country's sparsely populated but resource-rich Far East posed "a grave threat to our political and economic positions in Asia and the Pacific, and to the national security of Russia as a whole." The 2008 global financial crisis helped convince the Kremlin that the center of economic
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On SecuritySep 3, 2019 | 09:00 GMT
If members of the information technology department are recruited or volunteer to be an espionage agent, they can cause serious damage to their company.
Adversaries Are Eyeing Your IT Staff. Why Aren't You?
Since the advent of encrypted electronic communications, those who operate these communication systems at intelligence, military and foreign affairs agencies have naturally been a prime target of espionage operations. These communicators, or who the U.S. State Department calls "information management specialists," often have access to some of the most sought-after information like encryption keys that could be catastrophic in the wrong hands. Despite this, however, they've historically been treated as second-class citizens next to their affluent, Ivy League-educated colleagues who are conducting the actual diplomacy or intelligence operations. But while they may be overlooked by their own organization, they've long been placed in the crosshairs of hostile intelligence services. This dangerous oxymoron -- where some of the most underpaid, overworked employees are the ones with the most power to implode an organization -- continues to play out in today's business world. But instead of information specialists, they're called information technology specialists.
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AssessmentsSep 2, 2019 | 10:00 GMT
Employees introduce cellphones during a show by Chinese tech firm Huawei in Lusaka, Zambia, during April 2016.
Huawei May Be Helping Governments in Africa Boost Their Power to Spy
Chinese tech firm Huawei has been increasing its footprint across Africa, providing countries with new technology and telecommunications equipment, including most notably 4G and 5G mobile networks. According to an Aug. 14 article in The Wall Street Journal, some of this expansion has involved Huawei technicians helping governments in Africa to spy on their political opponents. In Uganda, the technicians reportedly helped national security services penetrate the WhatsApp and Skype accounts of an opposition candidate, allowing them to examine his plans for street rallies and other political activities. In a separate case in Zambia, Huawei technicians supposedly helped telecommunications regulators access the phones and Facebook pages of opposition bloggers and pinpoint their locations.
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SnapshotsAug 27, 2019 | 19:07 GMT
U.S.: A Chipmaker's Patent Lawsuits Risk Upending the High-Tech Industry
Legal action taken by U.S.-based chipmaker GlobalFoundries has the potential to disrupt supply chains for manufacturers of a variety of consumer electronic devices, including heavy hitters such as Apple Inc. In multiple lawsuits filed Aug. 27 in the United States and Germany and in a complaint filed with the U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC), GlobalFoundries accuses rival Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. (TSMC) of infringing on its patents by using its protected methods and equipment to manufacture certain types of semiconductors. It is seeking an import ban of the chips made by TSMC outside the United States using those processes and of any devices containing those chips.
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Contributor PerspectivesAug 21, 2019 | 19:28 GMT
A visual representation of bitcoin on display on April 3, 2019, in Paris.
The Future of Cryptocurrencies
More than 10 years since the first bitcoin transaction in January 2009, and almost two years since a speculative spike pushed the price per bitcoin to almost $20,000, cryptocurrencies are moving beyond cypherpunks and anti-government culture into the world of governments and traditional institutions. The transition is impossible to ignore. While some governments, central banks and financial companies see cryptocurrencies as a threat, others want to harness the advantages they offer. And some governments see cryptocurrencies as a way to save their own struggling economies. To understand whether nonsovereign currencies can serve as a default currency and what threat they pose to governments or how beneficial they might become, it's useful to examine some of the most interesting geopolitical and corporate use cases available.
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On SecurityAug 13, 2019 | 09:00 GMT
U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) whistleblower Edward Snowden speaks to the Council of Europe videoconference in June 2014.
Employees Can Be the Biggest Threat — and Asset — for Workplace Security Programs
For companies and other organizations, sometimes the biggest threat comes from within. Beyond knowing the ins and outs of a facility and having a reason to be there, an "insider" can develop a detailed understanding of internal security programs, policies and procedures to help them plan out and conduct their crime.  At Stratfor, we think about the insider threat a lot as our team frequently analyzes incidents pertaining to our clients and subscribers. Insiders can pose an array of threats depending on the nature of the targeted organization. In other words, an elementary school will likely be more concerned with protecting children’s physical safety than a manufacturing company. Thus, it is important to ensure your security program protects against the full scope of threats that may impact your specific institution via comprehensive and cross-departmental efforts.
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